Mark Ruffalo, star of ‘Dark Waters,’ expected to visit Wilmington for a screening of film

The movie is about DuPont’s contamination of drinking water in West Virginia; it hits very close to home for people in southeastern North Carolina worried about GenX contamination

Mark Ruffalo, star of ‘Dark Waters,’ expected to visit Wilmington for a screening of film
Mark Ruffalo plays attorney Rob Billot, the real life attorney who sued DuPont for contaminating WV drinking water. (Source: Focus Features)

WILMINGTON, N.C. (WECT) - Dark Waters, a movie about DuPont’s contamination of drinking water in West Virginia, hits very close to home for people in southeastern North Carolina worried about GenX.

In the film, Mark Ruffalo plays the lead character, a lawyer named Rob Bilott. Bilott is the real life attorney who helped a West Virginia farmer sue DuPont, after he said toxic sludge from their landfill killed his cattle. Bilott’s work forced DuPont to pay millions of dollars in settlements.

We expect to learn more tomorrow about Ruffalo’s visit when organizers release details about the screening.

According to public emails on the City of Wilmington server, the mayor’s office is working with On Location Production Services to organize a brief reception with Ruffalo, the mayor and city council members ahead of a screening of the film at Thalian Hall on Tues., Feb 18.

After Bilott sued DuPont for putting toxic chemicals into the West Virginia drinking water, DuPont’s chemical plant in Fayetteville, NC, eventually became Chemours, maker of the infamous GenX, which was discovered in the Cape Fear River in 2016.

We have been following the GenX water crisis since the public first learned of its presence in the Cape Fear River in 2016.

A study published in October showed the total concentration of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in the Cape Fear River before 2017 was nearly 1,000 times more than the state’s recommended “health goal” level for GenX.

Dr. Detlef Knappe, a professor at NC State whose research first revealed the presence of GenX and similar PFAS compounds in the river, notified the state departments of Environmental Quality and Health and Human Services and CFPUA of the research.

We continue to follow the latest with the GenX water crisis. For the latest, click here.

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