Need a new roof? Which materials will protect you from the next storm

Need a new roof? Which materials will protect you from the next storm
If a new roof is in order, now is the time to research your material options to cover your household and prepare for the next storm.

SOUTHEASTERN NORTH CAROLINA (WECT) - Whether it was a few shingles or the entire surface, many homeowners throughout southeastern North Carolina sustained some level of roof damage after Hurricane Florence. If a new roof is in order, now is the time to research your material options to cover your household and prepare for the next storm.

Replacing a roof will likely cost thousands of dollars. While never an exciting expense it's one critical to the safety of your home and family.

Roof coverings are offered at different wind and impact ratings based on standards set by ASTM International (American Society for Testing and Materials). For example, the highest wind rated shingle is labeled "ASTM D3161 Class F" while the highest impact level shingle is rated "UL 2218 Class 4."

Each type of material has its pros and cons.

Asphalt Shingles are popular options given their lower cost and ease of installation. Look for a high mile-per-hour wind warranty. These shingles are subject to faster aging than other options which decreases their resilience against the elements.

Metal roofs have grown in popularity and can last decades. They are often labeled with a fire rating. While sturdy, they can be dented by hail.

Metal roofs can stand strong against hurricane-level winds and many come with a warranty for winds up to 140mph. For perspective, a Cat 4 hurricane winds can range from 130mph to 156mph.

Unlike courses of shingles, metal panels are overlapped and attached to the building.

Slate roofs still cover some historic homes and are known for their durability, lasting three times longer than shingles, yet they are very pricey and very heavy.

Given the scarcity of suppliers in our area, fixing or completely replacing a slate roof becomes extremely expensive. Some homeowners have no choice but to use slate if living within the historic district where like must be replaced with like.

Contractors installing or repairing slate should be using sealants, durable underlayments and enough nails per slate when working on homes subject to high winds.

Wood shingles and shakes are made of cedar or southern pine. These roof coverings are durable against hail but are an unlikely option in newer homes given their risk to fire.

When choosing a roofing contractor make sure to ask for references and have a written agreement that includes information about their insurance, timelines and pricing.

Your roofer should remove the existing shingles rather than roof over them and a full inspection of the underlying material is in order.

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