Carolina Beach Council is back to business

CAROLINA BEACH, NC (WECT) – A week after elections, Carolina Beach Town Council is back to work. The elected officials moved several projects forward at their November 15 meeting.

Parking Contract

The council split three to two to allow government staff to negotiate a new parking contract with Lanier Parking. Town Manager Tim Owens recommended Lanier because the company already has a good working relationship with the town. Lanier's current contract with Carolina Beach ends in December.

Council members Dan Wilcox and Lonnie Lashley both agreed, but Lashley asked that the town renegotiate Lanier's bid. Mayor Joel Macon joined Wilcox and Lashley in approving the motion.

Council members Bob Lewis and Pat Efird voted against Lanier because they favored Standard Parking for the contract. Lewis said Standard would offer better technology and a more affordable price. Efird added that the town should try a different company, other than Lanier.

Water Research

Town Council voted unanimously to approve spending $29,000 in reserve funds to research a new water source for Carolina Beach.

The town's engineer said an Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) system is viable with a steady water source. He added that the source could be an outside agent like Brunswick County or the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority, or the town could supply itself with a reverse osmosis plant.

Government staff will study just that before council makes any decisions. Town Manager Tim Owens said the purpose of the study is to find the highest quality of water for the most feasible price.

A representative from the CFPUA told council tonight that the authority is planning an expansion down Myrtle Groove and Carolina Beach roads. He said it would be timely for the town to join in the near future.

Beach Renourishment

Council members also unanimously approved New Hanover County's proposal for an inter-local agreement to find a solution to beach renourishment.

The agreement has the county joining the beach towns to submit one application to the state for a permit. Once every municipality signs the dotted line, the agreement will establish who pays for what percentage of the renourishment process.

Kure Beach Town Council approved the agreement at its Tuesday meeting. Wrightsville Beach will consider the proposal Wednesday night.

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