‘Jitney’ explores the issues of gentrification, reconciliation and survival for African Americans in the 1970s

‘Jitney’ explores the issues of gentrification, reconciliation and survival for African Americans in the 1970s

WILMINGTON, N.C. (WECT) - A group of men drive illegal taxi cabs in a neighborhood where other drivers refuse to go in Jitney, a show that gives audiences a look at a slice of African American life in the 1970s.

Big Dawg productions will put on its adaptation of the show Thursday through Sunday, October 10-13 and 17-20 at the Cape Fear Playhouse, 613 Castle Street, Wilmington.

The play was written by August Wilson, who also wrote Fences.

Jitney explores the topics of “urban renewal” or gentrification, reconciliation and survival.

It is the eighth play in August Wilson’s Pittsburgh Cycle. It follows the stories of illegal and unlicensed taxi drivers, as well as their passengers in the city’s Hill district, a place where white taxi drivers refused to go.

The show’s actors said Jitney deals with the human condition and the characters explore real issues.

It’s an opportunity to experience a slice of African Americana, portrayed by some dynamic actors.

For tickets, call (910) 367-5237 or email bigdawgpro@gmail.com.

Copyright 2019 WECT. All rights reserved.