State officials require towns to monitor emerging compounds in Cape Fear River Basin

State officials require towns to monitor emerging compounds in Cape Fear River Basin
A letter from the state Division of Water Resources was sent to 25 municipalities requiring monitoring for 1,4-dioxane and per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances — known as PFAS — for three consecutive months starting in June.

RALEIGH, NC (WECT) - As part of its strategy to address compounds in surface water and biosolids, state environmental officials are requiring towns in the Cape Fear River Basin to monitor emerging compounds beginning this summer.

Biosolids are nutrient-rich organic materials resulting from treatment of domestic sewage in a wastewater treatment facility.

According to a news release from the NC Department of Environmental Quality, a letter from the state Division of Water Resources (DWR) was sent to 25 municipalities requiring monitoring for 1,4-dioxane and per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances — known as PFAS — for three consecutive months starting in June.

Those compounds do not have federal water quality standards. Data reviewed by the US Environmental Protection Agency indicates elevated concentrations of 1,4-dioxane and PFAS in drinking water that originated from the Cape Fear basin.

DWR monitoring also confirmed the presence of these compounds in Cape Fear basin surface waters.

A clear liquid highly miscible in water, 1,4-dioxane can be found in industrial solvents, paint strippers and varnishes. PFAS compounds, like GenX, are most often associated with nonstick coatings, firefighting foam and stain- and water-resistant treatments for clothing furniture and carpeting.

For more information on emerging compounds in the Cape Fear River, click here.

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