Icebergs

Icebergs
FERRYLAND, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 26: A large iceberg floats in the Atlantic Ocean, April 26, 2017 off the coast of Ferryland, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) (Source: Drew Angerer)
FERRYLAND, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 26: A large iceberg floats in the Atlantic Ocean, April 26, 2017 off the coast of Ferryland, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
FERRYLAND, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 26: A large iceberg floats in the Atlantic Ocean, April 26, 2017 off the coast of Ferryland, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) (Source: Drew Angerer)
ANTARCTICA - OCTOBER 27: An iceberg floats near the coast of West Antarctica as seen from a window of a NASA Operation IceBridge airplane on October 27, 2016 in-flight over Antarctica. NASA's Operation IceBridge has been studying how polar ice has evolved over the past eight years and is currently flying a set of 12-hour research flights over West Antarctica at the start of the melt season. Researchers have used the IceBridge data to observe that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet may be in a state of irreversible decline directly contributing to rising sea levels. NASA and University of California, Irvine (UCI) researchers have recently detected the speediest ongoing Western Antarctica glacial retreat rates ever observed. The United Nations climate change talks begin November 7 in the Moroccan city of Marrakech. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
ANTARCTICA - OCTOBER 27: An iceberg floats near the coast of West Antarctica as seen from a window of a NASA Operation IceBridge airplane on October 27, 2016 in-flight over Antarctica. NASA's Operation IceBridge has been studying how polar ice has evolved over the past eight years and is currently flying a set of 12-hour research flights over West Antarctica at the start of the melt season. Researchers have used the IceBridge data to observe that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet may be in a state of irreversible decline directly contributing to rising sea levels. NASA and University of California, Irvine (UCI) researchers have recently detected the speediest ongoing Western Antarctica glacial retreat rates ever observed. The United Nations climate change talks begin November 7 in the Moroccan city of Marrakech. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images) (Source: Mario Tama)
JOKULSARLON, ICELAND - JUNE 03: Icebergs that calved from glaciers are seen on June 3, 2017 in Jokulsarlon, Iceland. Iceland's tourism industry continues to thrive; just eight years ago Iceland welcomed approximately 464,000 tourists and by last year nearly 1.7 million people visited the nation. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
JOKULSARLON, ICELAND - JUNE 03: Icebergs that calved from glaciers are seen on June 3, 2017 in Jokulsarlon, Iceland. Iceland's tourism industry continues to thrive; just eight years ago Iceland welcomed approximately 464,000 tourists and by last year nearly 1.7 million people visited the nation. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Source: Joe Raedle)
JOKULSARLON, ICELAND - JUNE 03: Icebergs that calved from glaciers are seen on June 3, 2017 in Jokulsarlon, Iceland. Iceland's tourism industry continues to thrive; just eight years ago Iceland welcomed approximately 464,000 tourists and by last year nearly 1.7 million people visited the nation. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
JOKULSARLON, ICELAND - JUNE 03: Icebergs that calved from glaciers are seen on June 3, 2017 in Jokulsarlon, Iceland. Iceland's tourism industry continues to thrive; just eight years ago Iceland welcomed approximately 464,000 tourists and by last year nearly 1.7 million people visited the nation. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Source: Joe Raedle)
PORT KIRWAN, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 26: An iceberg floats in the Atlantic Ocean, April 26, 2017 off the coast of Port Kirwan, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
PORT KIRWAN, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 26: An iceberg floats in the Atlantic Ocean, April 26, 2017 off the coast of Port Kirwan, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) (Source: Drew Angerer)
FERRYLAND, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 26: A large iceberg floats in the Atlantic Ocean, April 26, 2017 off the coast of Ferryland, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
FERRYLAND, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 26: A large iceberg floats in the Atlantic Ocean, April 26, 2017 off the coast of Ferryland, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) (Source: Drew Angerer)
FLATROCK, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 25: Icebergs float in Flatrock Cove at sunset, April 25, 2017 in Flatrock, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
FLATROCK, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 25: Icebergs float in Flatrock Cove at sunset, April 25, 2017 in Flatrock, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) (Source: Drew Angerer)
JOKULSARLON, ICELAND - JUNE 03: Icebergs that calved from glaciers are seen on June 3, 2017 in Jokulsarlon, Iceland. Iceland's tourism industry continues to thrive; just eight years ago Iceland welcomed approximately 464,000 tourists and by last year nearly 1.7 million people visited the nation. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
JOKULSARLON, ICELAND - JUNE 03: Icebergs that calved from glaciers are seen on June 3, 2017 in Jokulsarlon, Iceland. Iceland's tourism industry continues to thrive; just eight years ago Iceland welcomed approximately 464,000 tourists and by last year nearly 1.7 million people visited the nation. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Source: Joe Raedle)
JOKULSARLON, ICELAND - JUNE 03: Icebergs that calved from glaciers are seen on June 3, 2017 in Jokulsarlon, Iceland. Iceland's tourism industry continues to thrive; just eight years ago Iceland welcomed approximately 464,000 tourists and by last year nearly 1.7 million people visited the nation. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
JOKULSARLON, ICELAND - JUNE 03: Icebergs that calved from glaciers are seen on June 3, 2017 in Jokulsarlon, Iceland. Iceland's tourism industry continues to thrive; just eight years ago Iceland welcomed approximately 464,000 tourists and by last year nearly 1.7 million people visited the nation. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Source: Joe Raedle)
SANTA CRUZ PROVINCE, ARGENTINA - NOVEMBER 28: An iceberg broken off from a melting glacier floats in Lake Argentino, which holds runoff water from the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, the third largest ice field in the world, on November 28, 2015 in Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. The majority of the almost fifty large glaciers in the surrounding Los Glaciares National Park have been retreating over the past fifty years due to warming temperatures, according to the European Space Agency (ESA). The United States Geological Survey reports that over 68 percent of the world's freshwater supplies are locked in icecaps and glaciers. The United Nations climate change conference begins November 30 in Paris. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
SANTA CRUZ PROVINCE, ARGENTINA - NOVEMBER 28: An iceberg broken off from a melting glacier floats in Lake Argentino, which holds runoff water from the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, the third largest ice field in the world, on November 28, 2015 in Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. The majority of the almost fifty large glaciers in the surrounding Los Glaciares National Park have been retreating over the past fifty years due to warming temperatures, according to the European Space Agency (ESA). The United States Geological Survey reports that over 68 percent of the world's freshwater supplies are locked in icecaps and glaciers. The United Nations climate change conference begins November 30 in Paris. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images) (Source: Mario Tama)
QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 31: A boat navigates among calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers on July 31, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. "Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. "We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 31: A boat navigates among calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers on July 31, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. "Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. "We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Source: Joe Raedle)
FLATROCK, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 25: A bird walks on the shoreline as an icebergs floats in Flatrock Cove, April 25, 2017 in Flatrock, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
FLATROCK, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 25: A bird walks on the shoreline as an icebergs floats in Flatrock Cove, April 25, 2017 in Flatrock, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) (Source: Drew Angerer)
PORT KIRWAN, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 26: An iceberg floats in the Atlantic Ocean, April 26, 2017 off the coast of Port Kirwan, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
PORT KIRWAN, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 26: An iceberg floats in the Atlantic Ocean, April 26, 2017 off the coast of Port Kirwan, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) (Source: Drew Angerer)
JOKULSARLON, ICELAND - JUNE 09: Visitors enjoy the view of Icebergs that calved from glaciers on June 3, 2017 in Jokulsarlon, Iceland. Iceland's tourism industry continues to thrive; just eight years ago Iceland welcomed approximately 464,000 tourists and by last year nearly 1.7 million people visited the nation. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
JOKULSARLON, ICELAND - JUNE 09: Visitors enjoy the view of Icebergs that calved from glaciers on June 3, 2017 in Jokulsarlon, Iceland. Iceland's tourism industry continues to thrive; just eight years ago Iceland welcomed approximately 464,000 tourists and by last year nearly 1.7 million people visited the nation. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Source: Joe Raedle)
ANTARCTICA - OCTOBER 27: A tabular iceberg floats near the coast of West Antarctica as seen from a window of a NASA Operation IceBridge airplane on October 27, 2016 in-flight over Antarctica. Tabular icebergs can measure many miles in length and are often formed after calving from ice shelves. NASA's Operation IceBridge has been studying how polar ice has evolved over the past eight years and is currently flying a set of 12-hour research flights over West Antarctica at the start of the melt season. Researchers have used the IceBridge data to observe that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet may be in a state of irreversible decline directly contributing to rising sea levels. NASA and University of California, Irvine (UCI) researchers have recently detected the speediest ongoing Western Antarctica glacial retreat rates ever observed. The United Nations climate change talks begin November 7 in the Moroccan city of Marrakech. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
ANTARCTICA - OCTOBER 27: A tabular iceberg floats near the coast of West Antarctica as seen from a window of a NASA Operation IceBridge airplane on October 27, 2016 in-flight over Antarctica. Tabular icebergs can measure many miles in length and are often formed after calving from ice shelves. NASA's Operation IceBridge has been studying how polar ice has evolved over the past eight years and is currently flying a set of 12-hour research flights over West Antarctica at the start of the melt season. Researchers have used the IceBridge data to observe that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet may be in a state of irreversible decline directly contributing to rising sea levels. NASA and University of California, Irvine (UCI) researchers have recently detected the speediest ongoing Western Antarctica glacial retreat rates ever observed. The United Nations climate change talks begin November 7 in the Moroccan city of Marrakech. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images) (Source: Mario Tama)
JOKULSARLON, ICELAND - JUNE 03: Icebergs that calved from glaciers are seen on June 3, 2017 in Jokulsarlon, Iceland. Iceland's tourism industry continues to thrive; just eight years ago Iceland welcomed approximately 464,000 tourists and by last year nearly 1.7 million people visited the nation. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
JOKULSARLON, ICELAND - JUNE 03: Icebergs that calved from glaciers are seen on June 3, 2017 in Jokulsarlon, Iceland. Iceland's tourism industry continues to thrive; just eight years ago Iceland welcomed approximately 464,000 tourists and by last year nearly 1.7 million people visited the nation. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Source: Joe Raedle)
FLATROCK, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 25: An iceberg floats in Flatrock Cove at sunset, April 25, 2017 in Flatrock, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
FLATROCK, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 25: An iceberg floats in Flatrock Cove at sunset, April 25, 2017 in Flatrock, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) (Source: Drew Angerer)
PORT KIRWAN, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 26: An iceberg floats in the Atlantic Ocean, April 26, 2017 off the coast of Port Kirwan, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
PORT KIRWAN, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 26: An iceberg floats in the Atlantic Ocean, April 26, 2017 off the coast of Port Kirwan, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) (Source: Drew Angerer)
FERRYLAND, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 26: A large iceberg floats in the Atlantic Ocean, April 26, 2017 off the coast of Ferryland, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
FERRYLAND, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 26: A large iceberg floats in the Atlantic Ocean, April 26, 2017 off the coast of Ferryland, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) (Source: Drew Angerer)
FLATROCK, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 25: An iceberg floats in Flatrock Cove, April 25, 2017 in Flatrock, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
FLATROCK, NEWFOUNDLAND - APRIL 25: An iceberg floats in Flatrock Cove, April 25, 2017 in Flatrock, Newfoundland, Canada. Icebergs break off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drift down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as Iceberg Alley. According to media reports, the higher number of icebergs this season can be attributed to uncommonly strong counter-clockwise winds that draw the icebergs south and possibly global warming, which could be making Greenland's ice sheet melt faster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) (Source: Drew Angerer)
UNSPECIFIED, ANTARCTICA - NOVEMBER 03: Sea ice and icebergs float as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft off the coast of the Antarctic Peninsula region, on November 3, 2017, above Antarctica. NASA's Operation IceBridge has been studying how polar ice has evolved over the past nine years and is currently flying a set of nine-hour research flights over West Antarctica to monitor ice loss aboard a retrofitted 1966 Lockheed P-3 aircraft. According to NASA, the current mission targets 'sea ice in the Bellingshausen and Weddell seas and glaciers in the Antarctic Peninsula and along the English and Bryan Coasts.' Researchers have used the IceBridge data to observe that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet may be in a state of irreversible decline directly contributing to rising sea levels. The National Climate Assessment, a study produced every 4 years by scientists from 13 federal agencies of the U.S. government, released a stark report November 2 stating that global temperature rise over the past 115 years has been primarily caused by 'human activities, especially emissions of greenhouse gases'. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED, ANTARCTICA - NOVEMBER 03: Sea ice and icebergs float as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft off the coast of the Antarctic Peninsula region, on November 3, 2017, above Antarctica. NASA's Operation IceBridge has been studying how polar ice has evolved over the past nine years and is currently flying a set of nine-hour research flights over West Antarctica to monitor ice loss aboard a retrofitted 1966 Lockheed P-3 aircraft. According to NASA, the current mission targets 'sea ice in the Bellingshausen and Weddell seas and glaciers in the Antarctic Peninsula and along the English and Bryan Coasts.' Researchers have used the IceBridge data to observe that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet may be in a state of irreversible decline directly contributing to rising sea levels. The National Climate Assessment, a study produced every 4 years by scientists from 13 federal agencies of the U.S. government, released a stark report November 2 stating that global temperature rise over the past 115 years has been primarily caused by 'human activities, especially emissions of greenhouse gases'. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images) (Source: Mario Tama)