Ohio River crests at 60.5 feet, highest level since 1997 - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Ohio River crests at 60.5 feet, highest level since 1997

The Ohio River may rise and hit St. Rose Church by early next week. (WXIX) The Ohio River may rise and hit St. Rose Church by early next week. (WXIX)
An aerial view of flooded Coney Island and Belterra Park (FOX19 NOW) An aerial view of flooded Coney Island and Belterra Park (FOX19 NOW)
CINCINNATI, OH (FOX19) -

The Ohio River crested in Cincinnati at 60.5 feet at 9:15 p.m. Sunday, it's highest level in more than two decades since 1997, when it exceeded 64 feet, according to the National Weather Service in Wilmington.

The river is now falling and stands at 60.21 feet Monday morning.

It will continue to go down but remain above flood stage for the next five days.

A FLOOD WARNING continues for areas along the Ohio River. Moderate flooding is expected through Friday.

Flood stage in Cincinnati is 52 feet. 

FORECAST: Severe storms and flash floods into Sunday

So what do all these numbers mean? Here's a foot-by-foot breakdown:

  • 52 feet (Flood Stage)

Increasing sections of Kellogg Avenue from east of Delta Avenue upstream to near Coney Island to near Eight Mile Road are flooded, as well as parts of Humbert Avenue in the East End of Cincinnati. Most of Public Landing is flooded, as well as Riverside Park off River Road.

  • 55 feet (Thursday's river level at Cincinnati)

Backwater flooding continues to affect much of northern Kentucky, southwest Ohio and southeast Indiana. Low-lying roads near the river continue to flood, with much of Anderson Township, Ohio, the East End and California near the river affected. Flooding begins to affect sections of Route 52 in southeast Hamilton and Clermont Counties. Low-lying roads in Bromley and Ludlow also flood.

  • 56 feet

Flooding affects much of northern Kentucky, southwest Ohio and southeast Indiana, including backwater flooding along creeks emptying into the Ohio River. Low-lying roads near the river flood, with much of Anderson Township near the river affected. Flooding occurs along sections of Route 52 in Hamilton and Clermont Counties. Low-lying roads in Bromley and Ludlow also flood, as well as stretches of Route 8 in Kentucky, and Old State Route 56 near Aurora, Indiana.

Widespread backwater flooding along creeks and streams occurs, with Route 8 in Kentucky, Route 56 in Indiana and both Route 52 and old Route 52 flooded in areas. Backwater flooding also affects Anderson Township, flooding numerous roads and basements. Locations most affected include low-lying areas near New Richmond, the East End, California and Anderson and Pierce Townships.

  • 57 feet

Significant flooding of California occurs. Backwater flooding along the Little Miami River affects basements and some first level flooding of businesses and homes, with low-lying areas from California to Newtown also experiencing this flooding. The East End experiences flooding of some streets, basements of homes and businesses, as well as low-lying areas near New Richmond in Clermont County. State Route 8 in Kentucky is flooded in low areas, as well as State Route 56 in Indiana and Route 52 in Ohio.

Flooding surrounds homes between Route 52 and the river in East End, California and areas of Anderson Township. Backwater flooding along the Little Miami and 9 Mile Creek surrounds low lying homes and businesses in Pierce Township. Water also encroaches on homes in New Richmond. Ludlow and Bromley in Kentucky become flooded in low areas, as well as Aurora Indiana along Judiciary and Water Streets. Portions of Route 52 in Ohio, Route 56 in Indiana, and Route 8 in Kentucky are flooded.

  • 58 feet

Numerous homes and businesses are either surrounded by water, water in basements or on main levels. Backwater flooding occurs along the Little Miami flooding low lying streets and properties. East End, California, New Richmond, Bromley, Ludlow, and Aurora and areas near Lawrenceburg outside the floodwall are most impacted. Buildings at Coney Island flood. The area around Freeman Avenue and along Mehring Way floods, as well as between Gest and Elm on Pete Rose Way.

  • 59 

Much of Route 52 is flooded from Cincinnati to New Richmond. Significant flooding occurs in California, Ohio, with several roads, Coney Island, and Riverbend Music Theater mostly underwater. Backwater flooding affects many roads in Anderson Township. Several low roads in the East End are also flooded. Portions of Route 8 in northern Kentucky become flooded, as well as portions of Lawrenceburg and Aurora, Indiana. Basement flooding of low lying homes and businesses is widespread.

  • 60 feet

Significant road flooding occurs in Newport, Kentucky. Much of southern Ohio Township in Clermont County floods, including about half of New Richmond. Flooding continues to worsen on Route 52. Backwater flooding worsens along the Little Miami and Licking Rivers, with some main level of homes flooded in the East End sections of Cincinnati.

  • 65 feet (flood level in 1997)

Major flooding continues in portions of the East End and in California with numerous homes near the river flooded. Areas along Route 52 through Ohio Township in Clermont County are also flooded. In addition to flooding along and near Route 52 in Ohio, Route 56 in Indiana and Kentucky Route 8 are flooded. Much of the Village of New Richmond experience major flooding. Portions of Ludlow and Bromley, Kentucky and Aurora, Indiana also experience flooding of riverside homes and businesses.

  • 80 feet (flood level in 1937)

This flood will exceed the highest stage on record. Huge amounts of property damage occur all along the Ohio River, with devastating backwater flooding also occurring along Ohio River tributaries. The City of Cincinnati becomes flooded at low areas near the river, with many Ohio River communities flooded. Backwater flooding along the Little Miami River and other rivers also result in major damage. Thousands of evacuations are necessary.

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