Play cricket with crickets, thanks to Google's doodle - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Play cricket with crickets, thanks to Google's doodle

Cricket played by crickets you can control. (Source: Google.com) Cricket played by crickets you can control. (Source: Google.com)

(RNN) - Cricket is one of those games you've probably heard of but don't know much about. Well, here's your chance to learn.

In honor of the Women's Cricket World Cup, Google added a playable cricket game to its homepage.

Players can control an actual cricket as it bats against a snail and runs between the wickets. The game also keeps track of your score and displays your highest score.

Each run between the wickets counts as one run, a ball hit to the wall counts as four and a ball over the wall counts as six, which sometimes causes Google's game to slow to a crawl due to a celebratory graphic.

The game also simulates the notorious length some cricket matches have by changing from day to night and back as the game progresses.

In real cricket, getting "out" can happen in a number of ways, but in Google's version it only occurs when you fail to make contact with the bowled ball.

The Women's Cricket World Cup began June 24 and ends July 23. The semifinals begin Tuesday with England facing South Africa. Australia will face India Thursday. The championship is Sunday.

The United States did not have a team competing.

Copyright 2017 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved.

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