PLAID PACK: Stage 4 cancer survivor shares secret to her success - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

PLAID PACK: Stage 4 cancer survivor shares secret to her success

Beth Quinn, a stage 4 ovarian cancer survivor believes her will to live and the fight within is the secret to her success (Source: WECT) Beth Quinn, a stage 4 ovarian cancer survivor believes her will to live and the fight within is the secret to her success (Source: WECT)
WILMINGTON, NC (WECT) -

Beth Quinn doesn't mince words when she talks about her stage 4 ovarian cancer. She knows she has a tough disease--a potentially deadly one. Her battle, however, is fierce.

"The key to my success would be the warrior, the fight in me," Quinn says with conviction.

Quinn remembers her diagnosis well. It was almost four years ago when her doctors discovered the cancer while she was having her gall bladder removed.

The thought of chemotherapy and hair loss was devastating. The thought of telling her family and friends was heart-wrenching.

"When people learn about your diagnosis, they look at you with this very pitiful sad look, and it's a diagnosis, it's not death," Quinn said.

She didn't have that calm attitude early on. She cried often. She says it was her husband who got her on the road to survival.

"Jim came into the bedroom one day which was on many occasions and he asked what was wrong because I was crying and I said I just don't want to die--I just don't want to die," Quinn recalled. "And in his simple words--his response was 'then don't.'"

She didn't.

Quinn started an organization called She Rocks to help the next woman who gets the diagnosis. So far, the non-profit organization has raised over a half million dollars for ovarian cancer research.

While her treatments have been hard at times, she's convinced attitude and a will to live can change your outcome.

"Instead of thinking 'oh woe is me,' I think, yay, today I get to live, I get to see the sunrise and the sunset," Quinn said with a smile.

Most women diagnosed with stage 4 ovarian cancer have a five-year survival rate of only 17 percent.

Quinn, who left her job as a bank executive to focus more on family time, knows she's not cured. Still, she looks at every day as though its a gift.

"Do I have cancer? I do. It's contained, I go for my treatments. I do what is prescribed to me but on top of that--I just--I choose life," Quinn said.

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