May 7 to 13 is Hurricane Preparedness Week - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

May 7 to 13 is Hurricane Preparedness Week

The average "return period" of a hurricane of any strength coming within 50 miles of a given point in the Cape Fear Region is six years. Matthew (2016) and Arthur (2014) were the most recent examples. (Source: WECT) The average "return period" of a hurricane of any strength coming within 50 miles of a given point in the Cape Fear Region is six years. Matthew (2016) and Arthur (2014) were the most recent examples. (Source: WECT)
Here are the 2017 tropical storm and hurricane names for the Atlantic Basin. As of the May 7, 2017 publication of this article, the Atlantic had already given life to Tropical Storm Arlene in April. (Source: WECT) Here are the 2017 tropical storm and hurricane names for the Atlantic Basin. As of the May 7, 2017 publication of this article, the Atlantic had already given life to Tropical Storm Arlene in April. (Source: WECT)

Hurricanes are irregular visitors to the Cape Fear Region; these ferocious storms require vigilance, preparedness, and, sometimes, life and property-saving action. May 7-13 is Hurricane Preparedness Week.

Do you know your property's risk for the flooding, wind, and surge that hurricanes can bring? Do you have a hurricane kit? An evacuation plan? And are you prepared, if and when the time comes, to take action?

Your First Alert Weather Team guided you through the inception, approach, onslaught, and aftermath of Hurricane Matthew in October of 2016 - and dozens of other storms over the decades. And this year, we're offering you something different: a completely digital hurricane survival guide. Look for the guide to hit wect.com and your WECT Mobile Weather App between now and June.

Atlantic Hurricane Season officially runs from June 1 through November 30. An average Atlantic hurricane season produces a total of 12 named tropical storms and, of those, 5 hurricanes and 2 major (Cat. 3+) hurricanes.

Most long-range hurricane predictions for the 2017 season account for a possible slow-developing El Nino pattern and, consequently, near-average Atlantic hurricane activity.

#ItOnlyTakesOne storm to change your life forever. This hurricane season, thanks for staying weather-aware with your First Alert Weather Team!

Copyright 2017 WECT. All rights reserved.

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  • First Alert Forecast: widespread heat, weekend storms likely

    First Alert Forecast: widespread heat, weekend storms likely

    Friday, June 23 2017 8:08 PM EDT2017-06-24 00:08:50 GMT

    A seasonably hot and humid summer air mass will bathe the Cape Fear Region into the weekend. Moisture from the remnants of Tropical Storm Cindy and the approach of a front will boost rain chances at times. Following the front, a dose of marginally cooler air with lower rain chances appears possible if not likely by the middle of next week.

    More >>

    A seasonably hot and humid summer air mass will bathe the Cape Fear Region into the weekend. Moisture from the remnants of Tropical Storm Cindy and the approach of a front will boost rain chances at times. Following the front, a dose of marginally cooler air with lower rain chances appears possible if not likely by the middle of next week.

    More >>
  • NOAA releases 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season forecast

    NOAA releases 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season forecast

    Thursday, May 25 2017 12:29 PM EDT2017-05-25 16:29:18 GMT

    NOAA - the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - released its 2017 Hurricane Season forecast for the Atlantic Basin Thursday.

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    NOAA - the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - released its 2017 Hurricane Season forecast for the Atlantic Basin Thursday.

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  • Hurricane cone-ology

    Hurricane cone-ology

    Today, satellites and supercomputers have vastly improved hurricane forecasting and warning. But one of our age's best tools for communicating a hurricane threat, the National Hurricane Center's official “forecast cone," can be misrepresented and is often misunderstood.

    More >>

    Today, satellites and supercomputers have vastly improved hurricane forecasting and warning. But one of our age's best tools for communicating a hurricane threat, the National Hurricane Center's official “forecast cone," can be misrepresented and is often misunderstood.

    More >>
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