Testicular cancer effect on fertility low - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Testicular cancer effect on fertility low

Treating testicular cancer can impact a man’s ability to father a child because male sex hormones and sperm reproduction are produced in the testicles. In most cases, however, the impact is low. (Source: WECT) Treating testicular cancer can impact a man’s ability to father a child because male sex hormones and sperm reproduction are produced in the testicles. In most cases, however, the impact is low. (Source: WECT)
WILMINGTON, NC (WECT) -

Treating testicular cancer can impact a man’s ability to father a child because male sex hormones and sperm reproduction are produced in the testicles. In most cases, however, the impact is low.

“It can, but it usually doesn’t,” explained Dr. Patrick Maquire with New Hanover Regional Medical Center.

The surgical procedure to remove one or both testicles, called an orchiectomy, is most often the treatment for testicular cancer, followed by chemotherapy. Usually, only one testicle is removed.

“You usually have your other testicle so you can make sperm,” Maquire said.

Testicular cancer usually strikes men between 20-39 years old, according to the American Cancer Society, so a diagnosis can be alarming for men wanting to father a child.

Maquire said most men diagnosed should not worry.

“About 70 percent of men can eventually father a child say six months to a year after their chemo is done,” Maquire said.

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