Hog farm creates a big stink for man - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Hog farm creates a big stink for man

One Pender County man says he saw this murky brown substance when he was outside during the early stages of Hurricane Matthew. (Source: WECT) One Pender County man says he saw this murky brown substance when he was outside during the early stages of Hurricane Matthew. (Source: WECT)
WILLARD, NC (WECT) -

The floods from Hurricane Matthew reached all over Pender County, including the hog farms.

At least 11 hog waste lagoons were inundated, waste water has seeped into our water supply. One man lives right next to one of the lagoons and its presence is in the back of his mind every time he steps out his front door.

"We are in fear of our life because we never know what these hogs are bringing into our neighborhoods," said Nick Woodard.

Woodard is afraid that waste from the hog farm could contaminate his drinking water. That fear grows during every big storm, especially hurricanes.

"When it rains real bad it, floods right on down through here all the way through there," said Woodard.

As the rains flood his neighborhood, he's confronted with a whole different issue: the smell.

"It's just not right for a person to live with the smell of hog manure, hog farm period," said Woodard.

He tries to escape it by keeping his family inside away from the smell, but that isn't enough.

"You can smell it all the way through your house almost even sometimes when you got your doors shut," said Woodard.

Woodard did venture outside to inspect the area during the early stages of Hurricane Matthew, but he didn't go outside during Hurricane Matthew.

"I went down to Willard and saw a lot of stench running across those creeks where it looked like a hog parlor had filtered over," said Woodard.

Congressman David Rouzer came to the WECT studios to talk about the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew and  touched specifically on what the area has seen due to hog lagoon floodings.

"You've got a lot of waste, a lot of human, some animal that is in our rivers and tributaries." said Rouzer. "But mother nature takes care of a lot of that and we need to do mitigate that as much as possible, but we need to understand this and look at this in the context of a 500-year flood."

But Woodard's problems are still there, even when we aren't in the middle of a once-in-a-lifetime flood. It's grabbed hold of his everyday life and he says he's worried it will never let go.

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