Mark your calendars: August 21st, 2017 will feature the “Great A - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Mark your calendars: August 21st, 2017 will feature the “Great American Eclipse”

A total solar eclipse will happen across the US on August 21st, 2017; and we will have a front row seat to see the majority of it. (Source: Wikimedia Commons) A total solar eclipse will happen across the US on August 21st, 2017; and we will have a front row seat to see the majority of it. (Source: Wikimedia Commons)
The path of totality will pass just to our south and west; but a short drive down HWY 17 will get you into prime position to see the eclipse. (Source: WECT) The path of totality will pass just to our south and west; but a short drive down HWY 17 will get you into prime position to see the eclipse. (Source: WECT)
SOUTHEASTERN NORTH CAROLINA (WECT) -

It’s a once in a lifetime opportunity for the entire lower 48 of the United States to see a total solar eclipse; and we have a front-row seat for the event in southeast North Carolina.

A 67-mile wide path carved out from Oregon to South Carolina will the prime viewing location for this event. According to NASA, this is the first time there will have been a full sweep of the United States of a total solar eclipse since 1918.

A solar eclipse is when the moon’s orbit crosses between the Sun and Earth.

In October 2014, we had a nice showing of a partial solar eclipse, where the moon covered about 10% of the sun’s diameter.

For the “Great American Eclipse”, southeast North Carolina will be able to see 96% disk coverage from the moon.

Though still an amazing sight to see, many say seeing the sun being fully covered by the moon is well worth a short drive to see.

In North Carolina, the southwest part of the state, includes areas like Asheville, Murphy, Andrews and Bryson City and Clingmans Dome, will see the moon cover the sun fully for about two and a half minutes.

A little closer to home, many areas of South Carolina will see the eclipse in totality; including Charleston and Georgetown for about two and half minutes.

If you plan on staying the eastern Carolinas, the partial eclipse will begin around 1:15 p.m.; the maximum eclipse will be around 2:45 p.m.

The next time we will have a chance to see a total eclipse in southeast North Carolina, in totality, will be May 2078.

Copyright 2016 WECT. All rights reserved. 

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