Changes could mean March vote on $2 billion bond - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Changes could mean March vote on $2 billion bond

The Senate Finance Committee made changes to a $2 billion bond proposal, which now could go in front of voters in March of 2016. (Source: WECT) The Senate Finance Committee made changes to a $2 billion bond proposal, which now could go in front of voters in March of 2016. (Source: WECT)
RALEIGH, NC (AP/WECT) -

An updated $2 billion bond proposal would allocate more proceeds to University of North Carolina projects and parks but slightly less to community colleges and infrastructure loans.
    
The measure approved Tuesday evening by the Senate Finance Committee also would hold the statewide referendum on the borrowing in March, in keeping with the date the House sought.
    
Sen. Kathy Harrington of Gastonia told the committee adjustments made compared to an earlier Senate version reflect changes agreed to with the House.
    
The new version would initiate $935 million in borrowing for 14 UNC campus projects, compared to 11 previously. Community colleges would share $350 million, down from $400 million. Parks would get $75 million. Water and sewer loans would now be $210 million.

To see the new version of the bond proposal click here: http://bit.ly/1LvgfxT
    
The bill is expected on the Senate floor Wednesday.

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. WECT contributed material to this report.

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