Senate votes to override McCrory marriage veto; House next - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Senate votes to override McCrory marriage veto; House next

Senators agreed Monday night to override the veto by a 32-16 vote. (Source: Raycom Media) Senators agreed Monday night to override the veto by a 32-16 vote. (Source: Raycom Media)
RALEIGH, NC (AP/WECT) -

Gov. Pat McCrory's veto of a bill that would allow some North Carolina court officials to refuse to perform gay marriage activities because of religious objections has been negated by the state Senate.

Senators agreed Monday night to override the veto by a 32-16 vote. That's above the three-fifths threshold necessary. The bill still must clear the House again for the veto to be canceled and the law enacted. The House vote set for Wednesday is less certain because of absent lawmakers last week when the bill passed.

Senators Michael Lee (R-New Hanover) and Bill Rabon (R-Brunswick) voted for the veto override. Democratic Senator Jane Smith, who represents Columbus and Robeson Counties, voted against it. To see the rundown of the Senate vote, click here: http://bit.ly/1db3LgJ 

The legislation allows magistrates and some register of deeds workers to avoid duties for all marriages if they hold a sincerely held religious objection.

McCrory says he vetoed it because no official taking an oath voluntarily should be exempt from performing duties.

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. WECT contributed to this report.

  • PoliticsMore>>

  • White House, in gamble, demands make-or-break health vote

    White House, in gamble, demands make-or-break health vote

    Thursday, March 23 2017 11:17 PM EDT2017-03-24 03:17:57 GMT
    Thursday, March 23 2017 11:17 PM EDT2017-03-24 03:17:57 GMT

    A late-night meeting of moderate-leaning members Wednesday broke up without resolution or a deal as most lawmakers left out of side exits and avoided talking to reporters.

    More >>

    A late-night meeting of moderate-leaning members Wednesday broke up without resolution or a deal as most lawmakers left out of side exits and avoided talking to reporters.

    More >>
  • Democrat Ford accuses Cooper of 'moving the goal post' on HB2 repeal

    Democrat Ford accuses Cooper of 'moving the goal post' on HB2 repeal

    Wednesday, March 22 2017 4:14 PM EDT2017-03-22 20:14:00 GMT
    (Source: Office of the Governor)(Source: Office of the Governor)

    Democrat State Senator Joel Ford (Mecklenburg) accused Democrat Governor Roy Cooper of “moving the goal post” on a deal to repeal House Bill 2.

    More >>

    Democrat State Senator Joel Ford (Mecklenburg) accused Democrat Governor Roy Cooper of “moving the goal post” on a deal to repeal House Bill 2.

    More >>
  • State Senator files new bill to repeal HB2

    State Senator files new bill to repeal HB2

    Tuesday, March 21 2017 3:54 PM EDT2017-03-21 19:54:20 GMT
    Sen. Joel Ford (D-Mecklenberg County) has filed a bill calling for a repeal of HB2, with a 30-day cooling off period before any locality could enact a law regarding access to restrooms, showers or changing facilities.Sen. Joel Ford (D-Mecklenberg County) has filed a bill calling for a repeal of HB2, with a 30-day cooling off period before any locality could enact a law regarding access to restrooms, showers or changing facilities.

    A state Senator from Mecklenberg County has introduced the latest bill trying to repeal North Carolina’s controversial House Bill 2. Sen. Joel Ford (D-Mecklenberg) filed Senate Bill 332 Tuesday. Along with a repeal of HB2, the bill calls for a 30-day “cooling off period”, in which no local government can “enact or amend an ordinance regulating public accommodations or access to restrooms, showers, or changing facilities”. 

    More >>

    A state Senator from Mecklenberg County has introduced the latest bill trying to repeal North Carolina’s controversial House Bill 2. Sen. Joel Ford (D-Mecklenberg) filed Senate Bill 332 Tuesday. Along with a repeal of HB2, the bill calls for a 30-day “cooling off period”, in which no local government can “enact or amend an ordinance regulating public accommodations or access to restrooms, showers, or changing facilities”. 

    More >>
Powered by Frankly