House bill would increase waiting period for abortions - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

House bill would increase waiting period for abortions

Four state House Republicans filed a bill Wednesday to lengthen the waiting period for abortions from 24 to 72 hours. (Source: WECT) Four state House Republicans filed a bill Wednesday to lengthen the waiting period for abortions from 24 to 72 hours. (Source: WECT)
RALEIGH, NC (AP/WECT) - Some North Carolina lawmakers want to place more restrictions upon abortion - particularly who can perform them and how long a woman must wait before undergoing the procedure.

The House measure filed Wednesday by four Republicans, Rep. Jacqueline Schaffer (R-Mecklenberg) Rep. Pat McElraft (R-Carteret), Rep. Rena Turner (R-Iredell) and Rep. Susan Martin (R-Wilson), comes on top of changes to abortion laws in 2011 and 2013 approved by the GOP-led legislature.

The new bill would increase the waiting period to receive an abortion from 24 hours to 72 hours. Medical professionals at the University of North Carolina and East Carolina University medical school also would be barred from performing abortions except in cases of rape and incest and when the woman's life is in danger.

The Senate filed a separate bill last week that largely focuses on rules governing abortion clinics.

To read the proposed House bill click here: http://bit.ly/1GhoIBo

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. WECT contributed to this report.
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