2014 Atlantic hurricane season wrap

2014 Atlantic hurricane season wrap
2014 Atlantic tropical storm activity was likely held in-check because of A) an abundance of dry, stable air over much of the tropical Atlantic and B) an excess of hurricane development in the eastern Pacific. (Source: WECT)
2014 Atlantic tropical storm activity was likely held in-check because of A) an abundance of dry, stable air over much of the tropical Atlantic and B) an excess of hurricane development in the eastern Pacific. (Source: WECT)
2014 Storm names (Source: WECT)
2014 Storm names (Source: WECT)

The 2014 Atlantic Hurricane Season, as most forecasters predicted, featured fewer-than-average tropical storms and hurricanes. An average season yields twelve total named storms, but 2014, like 2013 before it, had eight.

2014 Atlantic tropical storm activity was likely held in-check because of A) an abundance of dry, stable air over much of the tropical Atlantic and B) an excess of hurricane development in the eastern Pacific.

But, what 2014 may have lacked in quantity of Atlantic storms it arguably made up for in quality! Six of the eight named storms reached hurricane status and two made Category 3+ status, including Gonzalo, which lashed Bermuda in October.

The lone 2014 storm to strike the United States struck North Carolina. Arthur brought tropical storm conditions to the Cape Fear region July 3 and hurricane conditions to portions of the Outer Banks early on the fourth.

Atlantic hurricane seasons run from June 1 to November 30. Always nice to put another one behind us, but as we look ahead to 2015, let's keep a mindset of vigilance and preparedness.

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