UPDATE: State officials lift swimming alert at Brunswick Co. - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

UPDATE: State officials lift swimming alert at Brunswick Co. site

North Carolina recreational water quality officials have lifted a swimming alert that was issued on Wednesday for a Brunswick County site. North Carolina recreational water quality officials have lifted a swimming alert that was issued on Wednesday for a Brunswick County site.

North Carolina recreational water quality officials have lifted a swimming alert that was issued on Wednesday for a Brunswick County site.

Water samples collected Tuesday from the sound-side waters at the public park on Fish Factory Road near Southport showed elevated bacteria levels of enterococci. 

Tuesday's samples showed 306 enterococci per 100 milliliters of water, which exceed the sate and federal single-sample standard of 276 enterococci per 100 milliliters for tier 2 low usage sites.

Wednesday samples showed a significant decrease to 42 enterococci per 100 milliliters. This prompted officials to lift the swimming alert.

Enterococci, the bacteria group used for testing, are found in the intestines of warm-blooded animals. While it does not cause illness, scientific studies indicate that enterococci may indicate the presence of other disease-causing organisms.

People swimming or playing in waters with bacteria levels higher than the standards have an increased risk of developing gastrointestinal illness or skin infections. 

Copyright 2014 WECT. All rights reserved.

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>
Powered by Frankly