Update: Bertha strengthens, still expected to miss Carolinas - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Update: Bertha strengthens, still expected to miss Carolinas

Tropical Storm Bertha is not expected to directly impact the east coast of the United States. Tropical Storm Bertha is not expected to directly impact the east coast of the United States.
5 a.m. update: Bertha is expected to become a hurricane Monday and pass perfectly between the Carolinas and Bermuda on Tuesday. 5 a.m. update: Bertha is expected to become a hurricane Monday and pass perfectly between the Carolinas and Bermuda on Tuesday.
WILMINGTON, NC (WECT) -

Your First Alert Weather Team continues to track Tropical Storm Bertha.

As of early Monday morning, Bertha was located just north of the Bahamas, featured maximum winds of 70 mph, and was moving north at 17 mph.

Bertha is expected to become a hurricane Monday and pass perfectly between the Carolinas and Bermuda on Tuesday.

Bertha is unlikely to bring any direct impacts to the Carolinas (thankfully given our recent soggy pattern). However, heavier-than-average surf and rip currents are possible through midweek.

Your First Alert Weather Team will continue to monitor the progress of Bertha.

You can track the system in the palm of your hand with the Free WECT Weather app. Download the WECT Weather app for iphone: http://bit.ly/1rbqGNn or Android: http://bit.ly/1xai0as

Track the storm yourself with the interactive hurricane tracker in the First Alert Hurricane Center.

Copyright 2014 WECT. All rights reserved.


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