How do our lawmakers make a living? - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

How do our lawmakers make a living?

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Members of the N.C. General Assembly earn an annual salary of $13,951 plus $559 each month for expenses. Members of the N.C. General Assembly earn an annual salary of $13,951 plus $559 each month for expenses.
SOUTHEASTERN, NC (WECT) -

Serving as a state lawmaker may seem like a full-time job, but it doesn't pay like one. Members of the N.C. General Assembly earn an annual salary of $13,951 plus $559 each month for expenses.  

Rep. Robert Brawley of Iredell County introduced a bill that would increase the annual salary to $36,000. The measure has been sitting in committee for more than a month.  

Rep. Chris Millis, an engineer, says it's "practically impossible" for him to work for his employer while the General Assembly is in session. And between sessions, the Pender County Republican says he stays busy serving on interim study committees and dealing with constitute services.  

Despite the financial sacrifice involved in being away from his day job, Millis is opposed to raising pay for lawmakers. 

"I knew exactly what I was signing up for when I put my name on the ballot," Millis said. 

He stresses the importance of a citizen legislature that reflects diverse perspectives – a point echoed by Rep. Susi Hamilton. 

"Working families are who the General Assembly is really supposed to be representing," Hamilton said. "…it is an important factor that we stay in tune with the business community and the real world so to speak." 

But keeping one foot in the real world and one foot at the state capital can be a tough balancing act.

"It is a 24-7 activity. That is for certain," Hamilton said. "The technology allows us to be in two places at once today, which is really very nice."

But technology can only go so far. Thursday, Hamilton was torn between an important work meeting in Wilmington and a budget vote in Raleigh.

It's the kind of conundrum likely to continue as the General Assembly's so-called short session continues with no end in sight.

This is how some of the lawmakers in our area make a living when they aren't serving the public.

Rep. William Brisson

Position: Farmer
Employer: Self
Statement of Economic Interest

 

Rep. Rick Catlin

Position: President
Employer: Catlin Engineers and Scientists
Nature or type of business: Consulting engineering
Statement of Economic Interest

 

Rep. Ted Davis

Position: Attorney at Law
Employer: Self-employed
Nature or type of business: Practice of law
Statement of Economic Interest

 

Sen. Thom Goolsby

Position: Owner, attorney
Employer: Goolsby Law Firm, PLLC
Nature or type of business: Law firm
Statement of Economic Interest

 

Rep. Susi Hamilton

Position: Vice President of Business Development
Employer: Castle Branch
Nature or type of business: Employment screening
Statement of Economic Interest

 

Rep. Frank Iler

Position: Representative
Employer: General Assembly
Nature or type of business: General Assembly
Statement of Economic Interest

 

Rep. Chris Millis

Position: Professional engineer
Employer: Paramounte Engineering, Inc.
Nature or type of business: Civil Engineering
Statement of Economic Interest

 

Sen. Bill Rabon

Position: NC Senate
Employer: Self
Nature or type of business: (Rabon receives income as a veterinarian, according to his Statement of Economic Interest.)
Statement of Economic Interest

 

Rep. Ken Waddell

Position: Farmer
Employer: None
Nature or type of business: Agriculture
Statement of Economic Interest

 

Sen. Michael Walters

Position: President
Employer: Claybourn Walters Logging Company, Inc.
Nature or type of business: Timber brokerage
Statement of Economic Interest

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