How do hurricanes form? - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

How do hurricanes form?

WILMINGTON, NC (WECT) -

All hurricanes start as tropical disturbances, which are areas of unsettled weather or thunderstorms in the tropics.

The storms will begin to become a little more organized and spin, this is known as a tropical depression. A tropical depression has wind speeds up to 38 mph.

If the tropical depression strengthens and its wind speeds reach 39 mph, it then becomes a tropical storm and it is named.

Once the winds reach 74 mph, the storm is then considered a hurricane.

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