2014 hurricane season: Many thing to consider if you decide to s - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

2014 hurricane season: Many thing to consider if you decide to stay home for a hurricane

Many people are hesitant to leave their home, even in the face of a hurricane warning.  However as Warren Lee, New Hanover County Emergency Manager, says "If you stay home you must be prepared". 

There will be many things you need to do in advance of a big storm.  First and foremost you must assemble a hurricane survival kit filled with necessities.  This kit should contain enough supplies to last you for many days after a storm. 

Some of the most important items include: several gallons of bottled water per person per day, non perishable food, flashlights, batteries, charged cell phone, prescription medicines, and weather radio.

Other necessary items can be found in our 2014 WECT hurricane survival guide, available at WECT.com and participating Harris Teeters. 

Keep in mind that hurricanes can knock out power to your home for days or even weeks! 

If you stay at home during a mandatory evacuation and find yourself in trouble, possibly surrounded by a rising storm surge, Lee says don't count on emergency responders being able to reach you right away.  Responders are not going to put themselves in harm's way but they will do their best to help you safely. 

Lee says those who live in mobile homes must evacuate.  Mobile homes cannot sustain the same type of environmental factors that a stick built home can. 

Finally have a plan for your pets.  All counties in southeast North Carolina have pet shelters if you have to leave.  Usually only one county shelter is pet friendly so you must plan in advance. 

A compete list of pet shelter can be found in the 2014 WECT Hurricane Survival Guide. 

Copyright 2014 WECT. All rights reserved.

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