SCC cuts jobs in wake of less state funding - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

SCC cuts jobs in wake of less state funding

The college had been able to avoid job cuts until now, according to leaders. The college had been able to avoid job cuts until now, according to leaders.
COLUMBUS COUNTY, NC (WECT) -

Southeastern Community College is cutting jobs and reorganizing departments due to an expected budget reduction of more than $1.2 million next fiscal year, the college announced Tuesday.

The loss of state funds is due to decreased enrollment in curriculum classes, according to a press release.

SCC President Kathy Matlock said the college is cutting two faculty positions and seven staff positions. She explained three other employees had already announced they would retire or had accepted jobs elsewhere.

The affected staff members will retain full pay and benefits until the end of June, according to Matlock.

The college said it already absorbed a $1.3 million cut this year for a variety of reasons before this news, but to this point was able to do so without job loss.

"While job loss is always a last resort, the administration of SCC is optimistic that with these reductions and forward-thinking plans, the College will be poised to continue serving the Columbus County community with high quality education and job preparation opportunities," Liz McLean, Director of Marketing & Public Affairs, said in an emailed statement.

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