Work on the ‘Muni' to begin Monday - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Work on the ‘Muni' to begin Monday

Funding for the $1.2 million project will come from golf course, park bond funds and rate increases, with a completion date sometime this fall. Funding for the $1.2 million project will come from golf course, park bond funds and rate increases, with a completion date sometime this fall.
WILMINGTON, NC (WECT) -

Portions of the Wilmington City municipal golf course will close as crews begin work restoring the golf course's greens, fairway bunkers, and practice putting green.

Holes 2-6 and 12-16 located on the west of Pine Grove Road will be closed as this process takes place. The chipping green will be temporarily converted to a par 3 hole for the next two to three weeks before the entire course closes. Rates will be discounted during that time.

This will mark the first time the course has been fully restored since it was originally completed in 1929. A full overhaul will be done on the course. The pro shop will remain open during the construction process.

Funding for the $1.2 million project will come from golf course, park bond funds and rate increases, with a completion date sometime this fall.

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