Free Veterans Benefit Workshop in Savannah - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Free Veterans Benefit Workshop in Savannah

SAVANNAH, GA (WTOC) -

Veterans of military service are entitled to wide array of financial and other benefits; a new workshop in Savannah is set to help bring awareness with the programs and money available to them and familes.

Fox & Weeks Funeral Directors is partnering with elder law attorneys Smith Barid, LLC to present a series of free Veterans Benefits Workshops in 2014 to help local veterans become more familiar with everything that is available to them and their families.

The first Veterans Benefits Workshop will take place on Tuesday Feb. 25 at Savannah Square senior living retirement community. Fox & Weeks and Smith Barid will offer 1-hour informational sessions at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. covering a broad range of topics including detailed information on specific programs such as the Veterans Affairs Aid & Attendance Benefit as well as Burial and Memorial Benefits.
 
Michael Smith and Richard Barid, attorneys and founding members of Smith Barid, LLC, are VA-accredited and have become a dependable resource to help Coastal Georgia veterans and their families successfully navigate the VA Aid & Attendance Benefit process. Also known as the Veterans Pension, the cash benefit exists to help eligible applicants pay for medical care and can be a way for eligible veterans and surviving family members to receive $1,000 - $2,000 tax free on a monthly basis.
 
Veterans are eligible to receive a variety of burial and memorial benefits, but many veterans and their families are often not aware of the burial benefit or the process required to receive it. 
 
Veterans and family members can call Fox & Weeks at 352-7200 to register for the Veterans Benefits Workshop or request more information.

Copyright 2014 WTOC. All rights reserved.

 

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