Charter schools fight for crosswalks - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Charter schools fight for crosswalks

PHOENIX (CBS5) -

There are more than 500 students at Paideia Academy off Baseline Road and for parents, that makes arrival and dismissal a traffic nightmare.

Like many charter schools, Paideia Academy was built with a large loading zone but without any crosswalks. Ruben Lara says that makes picking up his grandson a dangerous task.

"This guy was backing up and he almost hit me," Lara said. "There's been a lot of close calls."

Paideia Academy Principal Brian Winsor says he's asked the city of Phoenix for a crosswalk to make it safer for students and parents crossing 15th Terrace but the city never commits to getting that crosswalk approved.

"It's just the ticking time bomb," Winsor said. "No matter how attentive somebody is, if we have that many people crossing without any one spot to have people cross as a crosswalk, I'm afraid it's going to happen someday."

The city's school safety coordinator, Don Cross, researches these requests and either grants or denies the implementation of crosswalks and schools zones throughout Phoenix. According to Cross, many charter schools don't fit the requirements for a crosswalk.

"Charter schools now are kind of a new animal," Cross said.

Cross says the state regulates where crosswalks and school zones can go and since most charter students don't walk to school, charter schools are built without crosswalks in mind.

At Paideia Academy, Cross says there's no place to put a crosswalk because the entire street was labeled a loading zone for school busses and cars picking up and dropping off students.

"We need something done," Lara said.

Unless the state changes its regulations, charter schools requesting a crosswalk or a school zone may need to change the way they are constructed.

The city of Phoenix says it's working with schools like Paideia to find a safe crossing point.

For more on this story and other stories around Arizona from this author, follow Shawn Kline on Facebook and Twitter.

Copyright 2014 CBS 5 (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Mom who went to classes with quadriplegic son gets MBA

    Mom who went to classes with quadriplegic son gets MBA

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 3:27 AM EDT2017-05-24 07:27:51 GMT
    Wednesday, May 24 2017 3:32 AM EDT2017-05-24 07:32:22 GMT
    A Southern California university has granted a surprise honorary degree to the mother of a quadriplegic student after she attended every class and took notes for him while he earned his MBA.More >>
    A Southern California university has granted a surprise honorary degree to the mother of a quadriplegic student after she attended every class and took notes for him while he earned his MBA.More >>
  • Pregnant teen blocked from walking at graduation

    Pregnant teen blocked from walking at graduation

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 2:45 AM EDT2017-05-24 06:45:22 GMT
    Wednesday, May 24 2017 2:45 AM EDT2017-05-24 06:45:22 GMT

    The school principal says the student and her parents signed a covenant, vowing the teen wouldn’t have sex.

    More >>

    The school principal says the student and her parents signed a covenant, vowing the teen wouldn’t have sex.

    More >>
  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>
Powered by Frankly