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Unexpected risk for holiday travel

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NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) -

The holidays are a time when doctors see a spike in heart attacks. However, this year if you plan on traveling in the Caribbean, you may face another risk.

Doctors said there are two main reasons behind the increase in the heart attack rates. One is stress, the other is people abandoning their routines.

Doctors said try to maintain good eating habits, don't overdo the fatty foods you put in your body and keep an eye on salt intake. Too much sodium can cause your blood pressure to go up.

Also, if you have travel plans over the next few weeks that include the Caribbean, you want to pay attention.

According to the Center for Disease Control, there have been 10 cases of a mosquito-borne virus among residents in St. Martin.

The mosquitos that spread the virus are the same as those that spread dengue.

Symptoms include severe joint pain, fever and headache.

The virus can't spread from person to person, but if a mosquito bites someone who is infected, it can become a carrier of the virus.

Copyright 2013 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved. CNN and NBC contributed to this report.

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