Mood changes around the holidays more common than you may think - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Mood changes around the holidays more common than you may think

Posted: Updated:
  • HealthMore>>

  • FDA to propose e-cigarette regulations

    FDA to propose e-cigarette regulations

    © FDA© FDA
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.More >>
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.More >>
  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
  • 1 in 13 U.S. schoolkids takes psych meds

    1 in 13 U.S. schoolkids takes psych meds

    More than 7 percent of American schoolchildren are taking at least one medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties, a new government report shows.More >>
    More than 7 percent of American schoolchildren are taking at least one medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties, a new government report shows.More >>
NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) -

Many people start dealing with the winter blues around the holidays, and doctors say it's more common than you might think.

Every December, doctors at Vanderbilt University Medical Center start to hear from folks who are feeling sad, tired or struggling to keep their productivity up at work.

It's a condition called seasonal affective disorder, and the feelings often start when the leaves begin to change, the temperatures cool and there's less sunlight each day.

In some extreme cases, people may start to feel depressed, gain weight or experience anxiety.

Doctors say their first, and sometimes most important, piece of advice during these months is to stay active.

"Even if you can walk inside the building, not just sit at your desk. Move around, get on a treadmill, go to the gym. I encourage people to bundle up and get outside to get light exposure," said Vanderbilt psychiatrist Dr. Judith Akin.

Light exposure is key. Some doctors will use light therapy to treat seasonal affective disorder.

A specialized light box can be used at your desk or in your home, and gives you light exposure similar to what you'd feel outside.

Copyright 2013 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

Powered by WorldNow