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Back to school: more than books and earlier bed times

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Back to school of course isn't just about back to the books and an earlier bed time. After all, you're putting your child's safety in the hands of someone else for a large portion of the day. Back to school of course isn't just about back to the books and an earlier bed time. After all, you're putting your child's safety in the hands of someone else for a large portion of the day.

(WECT) - Back to school of course isn't just about back to the books and an earlier bed time. After all, you're putting your child's safety in the hands of someone else for a large portion of the day.

Almost in the full swing of football season students are preparing to spend a lot of time on the athletic fields, and from concussions to heat related issues-- a recent CDC report shows there are signs of injury you need to know.

Each year, U.S. emergency departments treat an estimated near 200,000 sports-related traumatic brain injuries, including concussions, among children and teens, from birth to 19 years old.

Concussions are caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head that can change the way your brain normally works.

They can also occur from a fall or a blow to the body that causes the head and brain to move quickly back and forth.

Children and teens are more likely to get a concussion and take longer to recover than adults.

Handling a concussion situation can be made easy if you simply remember the ABC's of concussions:

Aassess the situation, Be alert for signs and symptoms, Ccontact a healthcare professional.

In helping the doctor assess the situation, it's good to make a note of the following observations if your child is involved in a sports or recreational activity:

What was the cause of the injury and how hard was your child hit?
Was there a loss of consciousness?
Was there memory loss?
Did your child experience a seizure?
Did they have any previous concussions?


Also, bullying is something you hear about all the time, from bullying in the school halls to bullying online. The recent CDC back to school safety report shows students in middle school are the ones to watch the most.

As it turns out, kids who are bullied have a higher chance for developing mental health problems, including depression and anxiety.

However, the families of the bullied kids aren't the only ones who need to pay attention. Studies show that those who do the bullying have a higher risk for substance use, academic problems, and violence later in adolescence and adulthood.

Of course the ultimate goal is to stop bullying before it starts, so it's important to check with your child's school to see what prevention methods they have in place for bullying.

The presence of the following behaviors don't always mean a young person will become a bully but your child is more likely to become a bully if they fit the following descriptors:

  • They're impulsive (have a lack of self-control)
  • They have had harsh parenting by caregivers.

Some of the factors associated with a higher likelihood
of being bullied are as follows:

  • Your child has a hard time finding friends.
  • They show signs of poor self-esteem.
  • Others consider them to be different or quiet.

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