Farmer's Market takes EBT cards - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Farmer's Market takes EBT cards

TIFTON, GA (WALB) -

Getting healthy and saving money is a great benefit to those who own an EBT card and now The downtown farmers market of Tifton, is trying to get more people on board with the idea.

They have accepted EBT cards for some time now and recent active marketing projects are being utilized to support the initiative.

Project Coordinator Randy Chambers of the Downtown Tifton's Farmer Market says he believes the benefit has brought more folks out and he hopes that the growth will continue.

"The more you promote it the more their going to come out because they know it's available. Our market is steadily growing and with that I'm seeing a large number of people come forward to take use of those benefits,"  said Project Coordinator Randy Chambers.  

The Downtown Tifton Farmer's Market is located at the Tifton Terminal Railway Platform and is open Saturdays from 9am until 12:30pm and will close for the season in October.

 

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