Indiana woman hopes workout will make her the 'Next Fitness Star - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Indiana woman hopes workout will make her the 'Next Fitness Star'

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Stacie Clark has designed a fitness class that burns a minimum of 550 calories an hour. (Source: WTHR/NBC) Stacie Clark has designed a fitness class that burns a minimum of 550 calories an hour. (Source: WTHR/NBC)
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BROAD RIPPLE, IN (WTHR/NBC) - An Indiana native is very close to reaching the ranks of the biggest names in fitness.

Stacie Clark stopped by Yoga Monkey in Broad Ripple this week to show her stuff - a class that burns 550 calories an hour and ask for your help.

The super-fit and very brave came to experience Clark's Barre Cardio class. Her choreography promises to super burn calories in 60 minutes.

"Depending on the fitness level and the person's height and weight, for sure, 550 (calories) minimum," Clark said.

Eyewitness News' summer intern, Olympic diver Mary Beth Dunnichay, agreed to sample the class.

"With diving, we do a lot of core work, so I think I will be okay there, but I like to push myself in cardio," she said.

Clark is a Danville native and Indiana University graduate. She is getting the word out about a nationwide contest. A thousand applied and she is one of five finalists to become Women's Health Magazine's next fitness star.

"The person gets to become the fitness expert and the face for the magazine, as well as we get to create a collection of DVDs," Clark said. "That is really important to me. It's not about winning the contest, it's about having the platform to have the voice to influence and inspire others to get fit, be fit, and stay fit for life."

Each finalist has an online video. You can vote daily through August 5 at thenextfitnessstar.com.

"There are a couple of 20-year olds or 20-something I should say, a couple 30 and 31 and I'm 40. I just turned 40," Clark said.

Read More: http://bit.ly/16V28Me

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