Mini horses find refuge at Brunswick County rescue - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Mini horses find refuge at Brunswick County rescue

BOLIVIA, NC (WECT) – A local horse rescue is helping several miniature horses get back on their feet, literally.

Debbie Batholomew, director of the United States Equine Rescue League Southeast Coast Chapter, is rescuing horses (miniature and large variety) from tough circumstances. Currently, Bartholomew has four miniature horses; two seized from a drug arrests late last year and most recently, two more mini's that were attacked and almost killed by dogs.

Bartholomew hopes to save as many horses as possible, but unfortunately it is just not feasible. But despite the cost and time spent, she believes in what she and her team is doing and will not give up on her love.

"95% of the horses I get in they could almost be beaten to death, burned with cigarettes all over their faces, thrown into bucks of water and left to drown," said Bartholomew. "The second someone is there to help them, it's amazing to watch the change in them and see they can still trust humans."

Rescue league officials urge the public to contact local animal control if you believe a horse or any animal for that matter is being mistreated.

Copyright 2013 WECT. All rights reserved.

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