2 semis, 2 cars crash on I-10; DPS reports low visibility - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

2 semis, 2 cars crash on I-10; DPS reports low visibility

(Source: CBS 5 News) (Source: CBS 5 News)
PHOENIX (CBS5/AP) -

Authorities say a dust storm moving through southern Arizona is being blamed for a four-vehicle accident on Interstate 10 near Picacho Peak.

Arizona Department of Public Safety officials say two semi-trucks jackknifed and two passenger vehicles were involved in the crash about 2 p.m. Monday.

Four people were taken to Tucson-area hospitals, but DPS officials say none of the injuries are life-threatening.

DPS said low visibility from a dust storm likely caused the accident.

Drivers along I-10 between Phoenix and Tucson have been dealing with dusty conditions and wind gusts up to 60 mph.

DPS said the westbound lane of I-10 at Picacho Road is partially blocked and there's no immediate word on when the wreckage can be cleared.

The National Weather Service has issued a blowing dust advisory and high wind warning for parts of southern Arizona until 8 p.m.

Copyright 2013 CBS 5 (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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