Michelle's Markdowns: $1 or less for grocery items at Harris Te - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Michelle's Markdowns: $1 or less for grocery items at Harris Teeter

 

WILMINGTON, NC (WECT) – There are still some great deals this week at Harris Teeter, though many of the deals repeated from last week.

Thanks to the Frugal Beach Bum for this printable list.  Remember, Harris Teeter in Leland will triple any coupon up to 99-cents:

 

See a full list of deals

 

Annie's Sack Crackers (cheddar bunnies),  reg/sale, $2.00

Use .75 off printable = 50-cents

Leland triples = FREE

 

Fleischmann's Bread Mix, reg/sale $2.50

Use 75¢ off printable = $1.00

OR RP 3/10 = $1.00

Leland triples = .25

 

Join Coastal Couponing FREE Community

 

Del Monte Tomatoes, reg/sale $1.00

Use 50¢/2 printable = .50 each wyb 2

Leland triples = .25 each wyb 2

 

Eight O'Clock Coffee, On sale BOGO $3.24

Use $2.00/2 printable = $2.24 each wyb 2

OR $1.00 off from SS 2/03 = $2.24

 

Hinode Rice, reg/sale $2.00

Use $1.00 off printable = $1.00

.75 eVic ZVR electronic coupon may or may not stack = possibly .25

 

 

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