WEATHER: A messy commute then chilly temperatures - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

WEATHER: A messy commute then chilly temperatures

WILMINGTON, NC (WECT) – Breezy, damp and raw conditions will make it close to unbearable (by coastal Carolina standards) to be outside this morning.  Our temperatures, chilly, near 40F for the morning commute, coupled with winds out of the north at 20-30 mph will push wind chills into the 20s.  Thankfully the trough and the upper level shower support will start to push off shore shortly after dawn –bringing an end to the rain.

Cold air will continue to move across the region into the afternoon as high temperatures will barely move into the mid 50s.  With the clear skies and relaxing breeze our overnight temperatures into Friday morning drop into the 30s with wind chills once again into the 20s.  This will be the transition to warmer weather as we head into the weekend.

High temperatures bounce up near 60F for Friday, near 65F with tons of sun on Saturday and almost 70F by Sunday with increasing clouds,

Another system moves toward us into the early work week bringing more shower chances and cooler temperatures.

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