Make sure you have a DD this holiday season - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Make sure you have a DD this holiday season

If you plan to party with some adult beverages this holiday season, be sure you have a designated driver. If you plan to party with some adult beverages this holiday season, be sure you have a designated driver.

NORTH CAROLINA (WECT) – If you plan to party with some adult beverages this holiday season, be sure you have a designated driver.

The holiday Booze it & Lose it campaign kicked off Friday and will continue through the remainder of the year.

Law enforcement officers will be in full force across North Carolina through January 2 to help keep the roads safe.

According to the NC DOT, there were more than 950 alcohol-related crashes in the state during the 2011 holiday campaign, resulting in 44 fatalities and 702 injuries.

"Make the responsible decision to designate a driver if you plan to drink this holiday season," said State Transportation Secretary Gene Conti.  "The choice you make could save a life."

Do your part to be safe this holiday season.

Copyright 2012 WECT. All rights reserved.

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