My Turn: The jump on vehicle taxes - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

My Turn: The jump on vehicle taxes

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(WECT) - When it comes to taxes, the concept of being fair seems to be elusive.  Whether it's federal, state or county taxes, each plan seems to have little quirks in it that gives breaks to some and punish others.

Our news team took a closer look at one of those this week.

In New Hanover County and other counties in North Carolina, the personal property tax for a car jumps after 25 years.  In one man's case, his bill quadrupled.

You see, the tax code sees a car that old as a restored classic and considers it a show piece for the average taxpayer.  Seems too sweet a deal for you to have one of those show pieces without paying more to the government, doesn't it?

But not all old cars are classics.  The taxpayer in our story fought back and got his car re-evaluated for a much lower bill.

Here's the problem with this.  Back when this rule was written, cars didn't last as long.  100,000 miles on a vehicle was a rarity.  Now days, 300,000 miles and many years of service are not uncommon. 

And for being frugal and taking good care of a vehicle, I don't think a tax payer should be punished with a higher tax bill.

That's my turn. Now it's your turn. To comment on this segment, or anything else, email me at yourturn@wect.com.


 

Emailed comments from viewers:

I agree 100%! I own a 1980 Chevy truck and each year I have to PROVE I've done nothing to enhance the vehicle. It has 180,000 plus miles and gets driven about twice a month. It has more rust than paint but it's always nice to have a truck to haul something for myself or a neighbor.

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Gary, I just read your comment below:

"And for being frugal and taking good care of a vehicle, I don't think a tax payer should be punished with a higher tax bill."

My truck will soon be 22 years old and has less than 70,000 actual miles on it. This is my "daily driver." I live on a fixed income and have kept my vehicle well maintained over the years and certainly don't feel I should be penalized for taking excellent care of my property. What's next? Adding extra taxes on older homes over a certain age that are well maintained?

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