Family grieves one year after Alquon Flowers' disappearance - WECT TV6-WECT.com:News, weather & sports Wilmington, NC

Family grieves one year after Alquon Flowers' disappearance

Alquon Flowers' family holds a vigil at Riverfront Park one year after his disappearance. Alquon Flowers' family holds a vigil at Riverfront Park one year after his disappearance.

WILMINGTON, NC (WECT) – The family of Alquon Flowers is still searching for answers one year after his disappearance.  Family and friends gathered at Riverfront Park Wednesday night in Wilmington for a candlelight vigil in his honor.

Flowers went missing one year ago in Navassa.  The Wilmington Police Department is still investigating the case.  At last check, they have no leads on his whereabouts. 

Alquon's father, Garry Hines, doesn't want to admit that his son may have passed away, but he's having a hard time holding on to hope.

"I'm hurt," said Hines. "I'm deeply hurt.  I'm all torn up.  I pretty much keep to myself more now than anything because I don't know what to say, what to do. It's eating me up inside."

The CUE Center for Missing Persons is assisting the family in the search for Flowers. Monica Caison, the founder of the CUE Center, says they're looking for any clue. Until then, they're trying to remain supportive of Flowers' family.

"It's important for families to have long time support," said Caison. "Our organization is built to be there for families long term and continue the search as long as they want to."

Hines hopes to find out what happened to his son for Alquon's only child, two-year-old Mackenzie.  He's not worried about her future because of the strong support system they have at home.

"I don't see any real mishaps on her growing up without Alquon because they (mother, grandmother) keep ‘Quon in her life daily."

If you have any information on the whereabouts of Alquon Flowers, you're asked to contact the Wilmington Police Department or the CUE Center for Missing Persons.

Copyright 2012 WECT. All rights reserved.

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Mom who went to classes with quadriplegic son gets MBA

    Mom who went to classes with quadriplegic son gets MBA

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 3:27 AM EDT2017-05-24 07:27:51 GMT
    Wednesday, May 24 2017 3:32 AM EDT2017-05-24 07:32:22 GMT
    A Southern California university has granted a surprise honorary degree to the mother of a quadriplegic student after she attended every class and took notes for him while he earned his MBA.More >>
    A Southern California university has granted a surprise honorary degree to the mother of a quadriplegic student after she attended every class and took notes for him while he earned his MBA.More >>
  • Pregnant teen blocked from walking at graduation

    Pregnant teen blocked from walking at graduation

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 2:45 AM EDT2017-05-24 06:45:22 GMT
    Wednesday, May 24 2017 2:45 AM EDT2017-05-24 06:45:22 GMT

    The school principal says the student and her parents signed a covenant, vowing the teen wouldn’t have sex.

    More >>

    The school principal says the student and her parents signed a covenant, vowing the teen wouldn’t have sex.

    More >>
  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>
Powered by Frankly